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Found 63 results

  1. Diane

    Town: Bloom Township

    From History Of Fairfield County, Ohio, And Representative Citizens: BLOOM TOWNSHIP Bloom township is in the western tier of townships. It is bounded on the north by Violet, on the east by Greenfield, on the south by Amanda and on the west by Pickaway County. It is laid out regularly six sections each direction. There are no large streams in this township, though the Hocking river rises near the center of the township. The Hocking Valley crosses this township across Section 1, in the extreme northeastern part, there are four good pikes running in nearly every direction. The Scioto Valley Traction line and the Ohio Canal pass through sections one and two. The township was laid off in 1805; the early settlers were the Hushors, Meyers, Glicks, Clarks, Hoys, Courtrights, Scotts, Crites, Williamsons and others. Abraham Van Courtright came from Pennsylvania in 1801. He married Miss McFarland of Greenfield Township and settled two miles south of Lockville near the Betzer Church. Jesse D. Courtright laid out Greencastle in 1810 and had it surveyed by John Hamilton. Samuel Weisser came from Pennsylvania in 1818 and kept a blacksmith shop for forty years. He was justice of the peace for thirty-five years and an official member of the church fifty years. The Presbyterian Church was built in 1861. Names that are connected with this church are Abraham, John and Jacob Courtright, J. A. Whitzel, Samuel Weiner, H. R. Roller, L. C. Friebley, William Swayer. The present (1912) pastor is B. F. Munson who also serves the church at Lithopolis. The Rock Mill was built in 1799 and was the first of its kind in the township. The building was low down among the rocks and the grists were taken in at the gable window and let down to the hopper with ropes. The first still-house was at the Stump Spring and was owned by J. D. Courtright. The Alspaughs, Williamsons, Granels, Blenbaughs all have left large numbers of descendants in Bloom township. Among prominent farmers today we note the names of A. V. Courtright, Reuben Faler, W. R. Coffman, C.C. Crist, S. P. Mathia, William Sitterly, C. E. Berry, Austin Smith, J. C. Hummell, Ed. M. Heister, Albert Runkle, Peter Dotson, Frank Zwayer, Irwin Solt.
  2. Diane

    Town: Bloom Township

    From History Of Fairfield County, Ohio, And Representative Citizens: BLOOM TOWNSHIP Bloom township is in the western tier of townships. It is bounded on the north by Violet, on the east by Greenfield, on the south by Amanda and on the west by Pickaway County. It is laid out regularly six sections each direction. There are no large streams in this township, though the Hocking river rises near the center of the township. The Hocking Valley crosses this township across Section 1, in the extreme northeastern part, there are four good pikes running in nearly every direction. The Scioto Valley Traction line and the Ohio Canal pass through sections one and two. The township was laid off in 1805; the early settlers were the Hushors, Meyers, Glicks, Clarks, Hoys, Courtrights, Scotts, Crites, Williamsons and others. Abraham Van Courtright came from Pennsylvania in 1801. He married Miss McFarland of Greenfield Township and settled two miles south of Lockville near the Betzer Church. Jesse D. Courtright laid out Greencastle in 1810 and had it surveyed by John Hamilton. Samuel Weisser came from Pennsylvania in 1818 and kept a blacksmith shop for forty years. He was justice of the peace for thirty-five years and an official member of the church fifty years. The Presbyterian Church was built in 1861. Names that are connected with this church are Abraham, John and Jacob Courtright, J. A. Whitzel, Samuel Weiner, H. R. Roller, L. C. Friebley, William Swayer. The present (1912) pastor is B. F. Munson who also serves the church at Lithopolis. The Rock Mill was built in 1799 and was the first of its kind in the township. The building was low down among the rocks and the grists were taken in at the gable window and let down to the hopper with ropes. The first still-house was at the Stump Spring and was owned by J. D. Courtright. The Alspaughs, Williamsons, Granels, Blenbaughs all have left large numbers of descendants in Bloom township. Among prominent farmers today we note the names of A. V. Courtright, Reuben Faler, W. R. Coffman, C.C. Crist, S. P. Mathia, William Sitterly, C. E. Berry, Austin Smith, J. C. Hummell, Ed. M. Heister, Albert Runkle, Peter Dotson, Frank Zwayer, Irwin Solt. View full record
  3. The GoAncestry Library database contains basic information on the printed materials in our library; you can browse the full Library here or use the search feature if you know the title or author. Browse below for a subset of our library focusing on this County:
  4. The GoAncestry Library database contains basic information on the printed materials in our library; you can browse the full Library here or use the search feature if you know the title or author. Browse below for a subset of our library focusing on this County: View full record
  5. The GoAncestry Library database contains basic information on the printed materials in our library; you can browse the full Library here or use the search feature if you know the title or author. Browse below for a subset of our library focusing on this County:
  6. The GoAncestry Library database contains basic information on the printed materials in our library; you can browse the full Library here or use the search feature if you know the title or author. Browse below for a subset of our library focusing on this County: View full record
  7. to promote genealogy through education of its members and the general public; to improve access to genealogical information in Fairfield County by maintaining an educational research center; to foster collaboration among members to assist those researching their Fairfield County ancestors; to conduct periodic educational programs and conferences to explore cultural, genealogical, and historical topics; to disseminate cultural, genealogical, historical and biographical information to members and to the general public. http://www.fairfieldgenealogical.org/ Fairfield County Genealogy Society 231 S. Congress St. P.O. Box 93 Winnsboro, SC 29180-0093 fairfieldgenealogy@truvista.net
  8. to promote genealogy through education of its members and the general public; to improve access to genealogical information in Fairfield County by maintaining an educational research center; to foster collaboration among members to assist those researching their Fairfield County ancestors; to conduct periodic educational programs and conferences to explore cultural, genealogical, and historical topics; to disseminate cultural, genealogical, historical and biographical information to members and to the general public. http://www.fairfieldgenealogical.org/ Fairfield County Genealogy Society 231 S. Congress St. P.O. Box 93 Winnsboro, SC 29180-0093 fairfieldgenealogy@truvista.net View full record
  9. To stimulate interest in the role of Fairfield County in the development of South Carolina and the nation. To preserve the history of the county through the collection of significant artifacts and interpretation of the personal stories of its citizens. To identify and document historic properties and sites within the county. To educate citizens and visitors about the heritage of Fairfield County. http://www.fairfieldsc.com/secondary.aspx?pageID=125 The Fairfield County Museum 231 S. Congress St. P. O. Box 6 Winnsboro, SC 29180 Phone: 803-635-9811
  10. To stimulate interest in the role of Fairfield County in the development of South Carolina and the nation. To preserve the history of the county through the collection of significant artifacts and interpretation of the personal stories of its citizens. To identify and document historic properties and sites within the county. To educate citizens and visitors about the heritage of Fairfield County. http://www.fairfieldsc.com/secondary.aspx?pageID=125 The Fairfield County Museum 231 S. Congress St. P. O. Box 6 Winnsboro, SC 29180 Phone: 803-635-9811 View full record
  11. Meetings - Regular meetings are held on the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. in the Fairfield County Genealogical Library, located at 503 Lenwood Drive in Lancaster, Ohio. Executive Board meetings are held the 2nd Thursday of each month at noon in the Genealogical Library. Visitors are always welcome at any of our meetings. Meeting space at the Fairfield County Genealogical Library (FCGL) is available for educational, cultural, civic and governmental groups serving Fairfield County, to conduct meetings and conferences. Meeting space is available on a fee basis to eligible groups. http://www.fairfield...y.org/index.htm Fairfield County Chapter Lineage Societies To identify and honor your early ancestors of Fairfield County, Ohio To recognize the proven descendants of the early families of Fairfield County To encourage quality genealogical research necessary to discover these early families' identities and to prove the connections between them and their descendants Fairfield County has two lineage societies which are described below. You must first be a member of the Fairfield County Chapter OGS in order to be considered for a society.
  12. Meetings - Regular meetings are held on the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. in the Fairfield County Genealogical Library, located at 503 Lenwood Drive in Lancaster, Ohio. Executive Board meetings are held the 2nd Thursday of each month at noon in the Genealogical Library. Visitors are always welcome at any of our meetings. Meeting space at the Fairfield County Genealogical Library (FCGL) is available for educational, cultural, civic and governmental groups serving Fairfield County, to conduct meetings and conferences. Meeting space is available on a fee basis to eligible groups. http://www.fairfield...y.org/index.htm Fairfield County Chapter Lineage Societies To identify and honor your early ancestors of Fairfield County, Ohio To recognize the proven descendants of the early families of Fairfield County To encourage quality genealogical research necessary to discover these early families' identities and to prove the connections between them and their descendants Fairfield County has two lineage societies which are described below. You must first be a member of the Fairfield County Chapter OGS in order to be considered for a society. View full record
  13. The Franklin Area Historical Society (FAHS) was established in 1965 to preserve the history of the City of Franklin and the area. This is accomplished through a variety of publications, including our newsletter, as well as the collections and exhibitions of objects of local historical importance in the Harding Museum and the Log Post Office museum. Our Mission: The mission of the Franklin Area Historical Society is the collection and preservation of objects and materials relating to the history of Franklin and Franklin Township, Ohio, and to disseminate knowledge of that history through educational programs, publications, tours and the operation of our Harding Museum and Log Post Office Museum. http://www.franklinohmuseums.org/
  14. The Franklin Area Historical Society (FAHS) was established in 1965 to preserve the history of the City of Franklin and the area. This is accomplished through a variety of publications, including our newsletter, as well as the collections and exhibitions of objects of local historical importance in the Harding Museum and the Log Post Office museum. Our Mission: The mission of the Franklin Area Historical Society is the collection and preservation of objects and materials relating to the history of Franklin and Franklin Township, Ohio, and to disseminate knowledge of that history through educational programs, publications, tours and the operation of our Harding Museum and Log Post Office Museum. http://www.franklinohmuseums.org/ View full record
  15. The Pickerington-Violet Township Historical Society was organized in 1987. Its mission is to preserve our community’s past for future generations to see and use. OUR MUSEUM Our Museum is located in the Olde Carnegie Library which was built in 1916 with a $10,000 grant from Andrew Carnegie. Pickerington was the smallest community in the United States to receive such a grant. When a new, larger library was constructed on Opportunity Way in 1993, the Library Board donated the Carnegie Library to the city of Pickerington with the stipulation that a museum be created and maintained. The Pickerington-Violet Township Historical Society has filled the main level of the Museum with a collection of artifacts and memorabilia including the original town pump, antique household items, clothing, business signage and equipment, school furnishings, photographs, written histories, birth certificates, death records dating from the early 1900s, and more. In addition, a gift shop offers visitors a variety of souvenirs which depict our area’s past. Included are note and postcards, prints, books, pottery, china, throws and T-shirts. The lower level is the home of photographs of Pickerington-Violet Township high school graduating classes from 1909 to 1981. This area also serves as the Historical Society’s meeting room as well as the office/warehouse for the Pickerington Food Pantry. http://www.pickering...calsociety.com/
  16. The Pickerington-Violet Township Historical Society was organized in 1987. Its mission is to preserve our community’s past for future generations to see and use. OUR MUSEUM Our Museum is located in the Olde Carnegie Library which was built in 1916 with a $10,000 grant from Andrew Carnegie. Pickerington was the smallest community in the United States to receive such a grant. When a new, larger library was constructed on Opportunity Way in 1993, the Library Board donated the Carnegie Library to the city of Pickerington with the stipulation that a museum be created and maintained. The Pickerington-Violet Township Historical Society has filled the main level of the Museum with a collection of artifacts and memorabilia including the original town pump, antique household items, clothing, business signage and equipment, school furnishings, photographs, written histories, birth certificates, death records dating from the early 1900s, and more. In addition, a gift shop offers visitors a variety of souvenirs which depict our area’s past. Included are note and postcards, prints, books, pottery, china, throws and T-shirts. The lower level is the home of photographs of Pickerington-Violet Township high school graduating classes from 1909 to 1981. This area also serves as the Historical Society’s meeting room as well as the office/warehouse for the Pickerington Food Pantry. http://www.pickering...calsociety.com/ View full record
  17. In 1962, seven Fairfield County women decided something should be done to preserve the lovely old homes of Lancaster, Ohio. They met at Petie Smith's house and signed a document of intent. They researched the operation of other preservation groups, and with the guidance of the National Trust formed the Fairfield Heritage Association. Each one of the seven women took an active role: Ruth Drinkle was elected President; Dorothy Peters, Honorary President; Caroline Rockwood, Treasurer; Mary Katherine Vlerebone, Secretary; Marian Furniss, Membership Chairman; Emilie Martin, Arts and Crafts Chairman; and Petie Smith, Program Chairman. http://www.fairfieldheritage.org/
  18. In 1962, seven Fairfield County women decided something should be done to preserve the lovely old homes of Lancaster, Ohio. They met at Petie Smith's house and signed a document of intent. They researched the operation of other preservation groups, and with the guidance of the National Trust formed the Fairfield Heritage Association. Each one of the seven women took an active role: Ruth Drinkle was elected President; Dorothy Peters, Honorary President; Caroline Rockwood, Treasurer; Mary Katherine Vlerebone, Secretary; Marian Furniss, Membership Chairman; Emilie Martin, Arts and Crafts Chairman; and Petie Smith, Program Chairman. http://www.fairfieldheritage.org/ View full record
  19. Our Society was founded at Buckeye Lake, Ohio in 1995 and the museum opened in 1998. Please stop in and view our huge collection of Buckeye Lake Park memorabilia. Our group covers Perry, Licking and Fairfield counties including the communities of Hebron, Millersport and Thornville, along with Buckeye Lake. http://www.buckeyelakehistory.org/ In September, 1994, a group of interested people came together with the purpose of starting a Historical Museum in the Buckeye Lake area. This was to preserve the historical record of the Lake, including the Amusement Park, the Ohio Canal, the Interurban, the National Trail, the early pioneers, early boaters - just the history of it all!! The group met in the Civic Association building on Hebron Road, and from the first, all were very enthusiastic. Donations began to appear: A gun from the shooting gallery, a Rocket Ship and a Bug Car from the old Park, a piano that had arrived in Hebron in 1840, roller skates, swim suits from Crystal Pool, photos, cards and other memorabilia.
  20. Our Society was founded at Buckeye Lake, Ohio in 1995 and the museum opened in 1998. Please stop in and view our huge collection of Buckeye Lake Park memorabilia. Our group covers Perry, Licking and Fairfield counties including the communities of Hebron, Millersport and Thornville, along with Buckeye Lake. http://www.buckeyelakehistory.org/ In September, 1994, a group of interested people came together with the purpose of starting a Historical Museum in the Buckeye Lake area. This was to preserve the historical record of the Lake, including the Amusement Park, the Ohio Canal, the Interurban, the National Trail, the early pioneers, early boaters - just the history of it all!! The group met in the Civic Association building on Hebron Road, and from the first, all were very enthusiastic. Donations began to appear: A gun from the shooting gallery, a Rocket Ship and a Bug Car from the old Park, a piano that had arrived in Hebron in 1840, roller skates, swim suits from Crystal Pool, photos, cards and other memorabilia. View full record
  21. George Berry founded Bremen in 1834 naming the new village after his father-in-law's hometown of Bremen, Germany. During the 1800s the village grew slowly, serving mainly as a service center for local farmers. In the 1850s the railroad came to Bremen. Then in 1907, oil was discovered in Bremen. Due to the boom, Bremen grew quickly and accumulated much wealth. The profit brought in by the oil was used to establish local industry, build a downtown commercial center, and line the streets of Bremen with beautiful homes (many of which can be seen today in the town). In 1907, Bremen, Ohio, was considered “Oil City.” Most of the villagers were in some way related to or were oil drillers themselves. Bremen was a boom-town. The Village was growing slowly in 1884, with a population of 200 inhabitants. However, this all changed with the “oil boom,” which began around 1907. Small quantities of gas and oil had been produced by local wells before this, but when wells began producing 140 barrels per day and 250 barrels per day, the race was on! Bremen enjoyed unparalleled prosperity during the next seven or eight years, then settled down to become an agricultural community once again. Outlying areas, including the private sector, also reaped the benefits of the gas and oil industry. Bremen Area Historical Society P.O. Box 33 Bremen, Ohio 43107 http://www.bremenvil.../historical.htm Platinum Membership Cost: $25.00 or more pre household Benefits: Discounts & voting rights Gold Membership Cost: $20.00 per household Benefit: Newsletter subscription only Silver Membership Cost: Donate time/money Benefits: Volunteer to assist the society General Public Participate at events, Visitors to activities Ticket buyers, etc. Community Support
  22. George Berry founded Bremen in 1834 naming the new village after his father-in-law's hometown of Bremen, Germany. During the 1800s the village grew slowly, serving mainly as a service center for local farmers. In the 1850s the railroad came to Bremen. Then in 1907, oil was discovered in Bremen. Due to the boom, Bremen grew quickly and accumulated much wealth. The profit brought in by the oil was used to establish local industry, build a downtown commercial center, and line the streets of Bremen with beautiful homes (many of which can be seen today in the town). In 1907, Bremen, Ohio, was considered “Oil City.” Most of the villagers were in some way related to or were oil drillers themselves. Bremen was a boom-town. The Village was growing slowly in 1884, with a population of 200 inhabitants. However, this all changed with the “oil boom,” which began around 1907. Small quantities of gas and oil had been produced by local wells before this, but when wells began producing 140 barrels per day and 250 barrels per day, the race was on! Bremen enjoyed unparalleled prosperity during the next seven or eight years, then settled down to become an agricultural community once again. Outlying areas, including the private sector, also reaped the benefits of the gas and oil industry. Bremen Area Historical Society P.O. Box 33 Bremen, Ohio 43107 http://www.bremenvil.../historical.htm Platinum Membership Cost: $25.00 or more pre household Benefits: Discounts & voting rights Gold Membership Cost: $20.00 per household Benefit: Newsletter subscription only Silver Membership Cost: Donate time/money Benefits: Volunteer to assist the society General Public Participate at events, Visitors to activities Ticket buyers, etc. Community Support View full record
  23. On December 9, 1800, the government of the Northwest Territory authorized the creation of Fairfield County. Residents named the county after the area's "fair fields." Zane's Trace passed through the county. The population grew as people moved westward into the Northwest Territory. For full text, see: http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Fairfield_County.
  24. On December 9, 1800, the government of the Northwest Territory authorized the creation of Fairfield County. Residents named the county after the area's "fair fields." Zane's Trace passed through the county. The population grew as people moved westward into the Northwest Territory. For full text, see: http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Fairfield_County. View full record
  25. Interment.net No records yet. http://www.interment.net/us/oh/fairfield.htm Find A Grave http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=csr&CScn=&CScntry=4&CSst=37&CScnty=2062
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