Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hunterdon'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Forums

  • GoAncestry Information and Fun
    • Ancestry
    • Influencing Factors
    • Tall Tales Tavern
    • Trading Post
    • Website Information and Help
  • Projects, and Unique Information
    • Library Look-ups and Reviews
    • Postcards to you?
    • Surnames
  • Genealogy and History, America
    • General Discussion
    • Canada
    • Midwest US Region
    • Northeast US Region
    • South US Region
    • West US Region
  • Genealogy and History, Europe
    • General Discussion
    • Central Europe
    • Eastern Europe
    • Northern Europe
    • Southern Europe
    • Western Europe
  • Private Areas
    • Family Historians
  • German Ancestral Studies's GAS Topics

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • German Ancestral Studies's Gas Events

Categories

  • International
    • Austria
    • Belgium
    • Canada
    • Czech Republic
    • Denmark
    • France
    • Germany
    • Great Britain
    • Ireland
    • Lithuania (Prussia)
    • Netherlands
    • Poland
    • Russia-Germanic
    • Sweden
    • Switzerland
  • National
    • US Midwest
    • US Northeast
    • US South
    • US West

Categories

  • Cultures and Groups
  • Family Histories and Genealogies
  • Industry and Transportation
  • Migration and Colonization
  • Military and War
  • International Regions
  • US Midwest
  • US Northeast
  • US South
  • US West

Categories

  • Addressee A-C
  • Addressee D-F
  • Addressee G-I
  • Addressee J-L
  • Addressee M-O
  • Addressee P-S
  • Addressee T-V
  • Addressee W-Z

Categories

  • Surnames A-C
  • Surnames D-F
  • Surnames G-I
  • Surnames J-L
  • Surnames M-O
  • Surnames P-S
  • Surnames T-V
  • Surnames W-Z

Found 23 results

  1. https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3814a.la002348/ Love this map, provides great detail to the area and once you get bearings provides a nice perspective on how the old farms line up with today's maps.
  2. https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3814a.la002348/ Love this map, provides great detail to the area and once you get bearings provides a nice perspective on how the old farms line up with today's maps. View full record
  3. Abstract: Hunterdon County

    Hunterdon County is located in the western section of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 128,349. It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Flemington. Hunterdon County was separated from Burlington County on March 11, 1714. At that time Hunterdon County was large, going from Assunpink Creek near Trenton to the New York State line which at that time was about 10 miles (16 km) north of Port Jervis, New York. After separating from Burlington County, Hunterdon included all of present day Morris, Sussex and Warren counties. On March 15, 1739, Morris County (which at the time included what would later become Sussex County and Warren County) was separated from Hunterdon County. The rolling hills and rich soils which produce bountiful agricultural crops drew Native American tribes and then Europeans to the area. Hunterdon County was named for Robert Hunter, a colonial governor of New Jersey. View full record
  4. Abstract: Hunterdon County

    Hunterdon County is located in the western section of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 128,349. It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Flemington. Hunterdon County was separated from Burlington County on March 11, 1714. At that time Hunterdon County was large, going from Assunpink Creek near Trenton to the New York State line which at that time was about 10 miles (16 km) north of Port Jervis, New York. After separating from Burlington County, Hunterdon included all of present day Morris, Sussex and Warren counties. On March 15, 1739, Morris County (which at the time included what would later become Sussex County and Warren County) was separated from Hunterdon County. The rolling hills and rich soils which produce bountiful agricultural crops drew Native American tribes and then Europeans to the area. Hunterdon County was named for Robert Hunter, a colonial governor of New Jersey.
  5. The following is taken from "Early History of Lambertville, NJ. 1703-1903". It is an interesting account of how the populace attempted to protect themselves, care for others, and survive various plagues. Just below the present rubber mill on Main street a village of small shanties for families and large boarding shanties sprung into existence, and emigrants poured in by the shiploads. Distressed creatures they were, too, these men and women, carrying on their backs and heads all their earthly possessions, and looking like Bunyan's Pilgrim, fleeing from the City of Destruction. They also brought with them a pestilence. Quarantine restrictions evidently were not, at that time, what they are at the present. The epidemic of "Asiatic Cholera" broke out among these people, spreading, not only through the town, but to the outlying districts. One Sunday three men were walking from Bool's Island to the town, when, on nearing it, one of the number was suddenly stricken with the dread disease. His companions hurried him, with all speed, to the doctors, and from there he was taken to an Irish boarding house, located on the southeast corner of Main and Lilly streets, but the terrified inmates refused him admittance, so he was carried to the barn and made as comfortable as the circumstances would permit, but he died in the course of a few hours. The next morning his companions took his clothing and whatever blankets had been used about him, carried them on long poles across the meadow and buried them back of the Baptist Church on what is now Ferry street. This was the first case. The entire community was dreadfully alarmed, as they had ample cause to be. The late Ashbel Welch, then a young civil engineer in the employ of the Canal Company, at once took an active part in organizing a Board of Health, procuring hospital accommodations and providing a "Potter's Field" for the burial of its victims. The stone house on the side of the hill just opposite the lot owned by Mr. John Lilly stood in the same unfinished condition as his father, when a boy, had found it. Workmen were at once set to work to finish it as rapidly as possible for the admission of patients, and nurses were procured. A great many of the floating homeless were taken there, and perhaps many others, but it is not known that one cholera victim left it alive, and one of the nurses (a colored man) died at his own home. The children on the streets shunned all the emigrants as well as any dirty-looking people. The doctors and the Board of Health issued precautions, both as to diet and cleanliness. To the dirty and dissipated, when stricken, it was, without fail, fatal, and such victims lived but a few hours after being taken with this dreadful disease. Multitudes were buried in the Potter's Field, the location of which was on the south side of the Rocktown road, a little below the farm now owned by Mr. John Lilly, on land which he purchased recently (1901), and on the verge of a small gully. Nor were the residents of the town exempt from this dreadful plague. A little indiscretion in diet or exposure would very often result fatally. Even "Cholera Morbus" became epidemic, it being so nearly allied to cholera, and not infrequently caused death. Surely this year (1832) was one of terror and gloom to the inhabitants, and depression seemed depicted on every countenance, as each one felt he might be the next victim. In the year 1849 and 1854 the town was again visited by this plague, many dying; but there was no comparison in the death rate either time to that of 1832. View full record
  6. The following is taken from "Early History of Lambertville, NJ. 1703-1903". It is an interesting account of how the populace attempted to protect themselves, care for others, and survive various plagues. Just below the present rubber mill on Main street a village of small shanties for families and large boarding shanties sprung into existence, and emigrants poured in by the shiploads. Distressed creatures they were, too, these men and women, carrying on their backs and heads all their earthly possessions, and looking like Bunyan's Pilgrim, fleeing from the City of Destruction. They also brought with them a pestilence. Quarantine restrictions evidently were not, at that time, what they are at the present. The epidemic of "Asiatic Cholera" broke out among these people, spreading, not only through the town, but to the outlying districts. One Sunday three men were walking from Bool's Island to the town, when, on nearing it, one of the number was suddenly stricken with the dread disease. His companions hurried him, with all speed, to the doctors, and from there he was taken to an Irish boarding house, located on the southeast corner of Main and Lilly streets, but the terrified inmates refused him admittance, so he was carried to the barn and made as comfortable as the circumstances would permit, but he died in the course of a few hours. The next morning his companions took his clothing and whatever blankets had been used about him, carried them on long poles across the meadow and buried them back of the Baptist Church on what is now Ferry street. This was the first case. The entire community was dreadfully alarmed, as they had ample cause to be. The late Ashbel Welch, then a young civil engineer in the employ of the Canal Company, at once took an active part in organizing a Board of Health, procuring hospital accommodations and providing a "Potter's Field" for the burial of its victims. The stone house on the side of the hill just opposite the lot owned by Mr. John Lilly stood in the same unfinished condition as his father, when a boy, had found it. Workmen were at once set to work to finish it as rapidly as possible for the admission of patients, and nurses were procured. A great many of the floating homeless were taken there, and perhaps many others, but it is not known that one cholera victim left it alive, and one of the nurses (a colored man) died at his own home. The children on the streets shunned all the emigrants as well as any dirty-looking people. The doctors and the Board of Health issued precautions, both as to diet and cleanliness. To the dirty and dissipated, when stricken, it was, without fail, fatal, and such victims lived but a few hours after being taken with this dreadful disease. Multitudes were buried in the Potter's Field, the location of which was on the south side of the Rocktown road, a little below the farm now owned by Mr. John Lilly, on land which he purchased recently (1901), and on the verge of a small gully. Nor were the residents of the town exempt from this dreadful plague. A little indiscretion in diet or exposure would very often result fatally. Even "Cholera Morbus" became epidemic, it being so nearly allied to cholera, and not infrequently caused death. Surely this year (1832) was one of terror and gloom to the inhabitants, and depression seemed depicted on every countenance, as each one felt he might be the next victim. In the year 1849 and 1854 the town was again visited by this plague, many dying; but there was no comparison in the death rate either time to that of 1832.
  7. Misc: Settling The Raritan

    Initial colonization was sparse. The area having been inhabited primarily by TREES. There were some "Raritans" or Native Americans that had moved up from the south to occupy the region for a time. When the settlement of the country commenced, a few families came from New-York, as White, Codrington, Royce, and possibly others, and settled on the lands they had purchased. Then Cornelius and John Tunison and Peter and Jerome Van Nest emigrated from Long Island and located on the Raritan, near Somerville, about 1683. John Inians, a merchant of New-York, purchased, November 10th, 1681,a tract of land on the Raritan, embracing the territory on which the city of New-Brunswick was afterward built, and others soon bought up nearly the whole space subsequently included in the Three-Mile Run and Six-Mile Run congregations. Additional settlers followed whether by road or rive. Soon after the Tunisons and Van Nests settled, Cornelius Vroom, Michael Hansson, Andries Aullyn, Derick Middagh, Michael Van Veghten came and joined them. Frederick Garretson, William Morrison, John Oatman Wortman, Jacob Sebring, Isaac Bodyn, Edward Drinkwater, Reuben Jonsen, Johannes Dameld, Gabriel Lebertstein, Hendrick Reyniersen, John Roelofson, Thomas Posselle, Folkerd Hendricksen, Pieter Dumont, John Hanse Hoeverden, Josias Merlett, Cornelius Powelsen, William Claessen, and others soon found their way. In the vicinity of Three-Mile Run the earliest names derived from the church records are Roelef Sebring, Hendrick Bries, Roelf Lucas Van Voorhees, Aart Artsen, Isaac Van Dyke, Johannes Folkersen, Jan Aten, Laurens Williams, Jacob Oake, Roelef Nevius, Charles Fonteyn, Hans Stoothoof, and Thomas Bowman. View full record
  8. Misc: Settling The Raritan

    Initial colonization was sparse. The area having been inhabited primarily by TREES. There were some "Raritans" or Native Americans that had moved up from the south to occupy the region for a time. When the settlement of the country commenced, a few families came from New-York, as White, Codrington, Royce, and possibly others, and settled on the lands they had purchased. Then Cornelius and John Tunison and Peter and Jerome Van Nest emigrated from Long Island and located on the Raritan, near Somerville, about 1683. John Inians, a merchant of New-York, purchased, November 10th, 1681,a tract of land on the Raritan, embracing the territory on which the city of New-Brunswick was afterward built, and others soon bought up nearly the whole space subsequently included in the Three-Mile Run and Six-Mile Run congregations. Additional settlers followed whether by road or rive. Soon after the Tunisons and Van Nests settled, Cornelius Vroom, Michael Hansson, Andries Aullyn, Derick Middagh, Michael Van Veghten came and joined them. Frederick Garretson, William Morrison, John Oatman Wortman, Jacob Sebring, Isaac Bodyn, Edward Drinkwater, Reuben Jonsen, Johannes Dameld, Gabriel Lebertstein, Hendrick Reyniersen, John Roelofson, Thomas Posselle, Folkerd Hendricksen, Pieter Dumont, John Hanse Hoeverden, Josias Merlett, Cornelius Powelsen, William Claessen, and others soon found their way. In the vicinity of Three-Mile Run the earliest names derived from the church records are Roelef Sebring, Hendrick Bries, Roelf Lucas Van Voorhees, Aart Artsen, Isaac Van Dyke, Johannes Folkersen, Jan Aten, Laurens Williams, Jacob Oake, Roelef Nevius, Charles Fonteyn, Hans Stoothoof, and Thomas Bowman.
  9. 8 Great Reasons to Join the Lambertville Historical Society You care about Lambertville and want to learn more about its history and traditions You value historic architecture and period furnishings and want to help preserve them. You believe it’s important to sustain a research center on Lambertville history. You enjoy lectures by great speakers and field trips to interesting places. You take pleasure in participating in projects that promote community pride. You want to do your part to maintain a landmark in the heart of Lambertville. You like spending time with people who share your interests. You’re committed to making a difference in your community! http://lambertvilleh...calsociety.org/ View full record
  10. 8 Great Reasons to Join the Lambertville Historical Society You care about Lambertville and want to learn more about its history and traditions You value historic architecture and period furnishings and want to help preserve them. You believe it’s important to sustain a research center on Lambertville history. You enjoy lectures by great speakers and field trips to interesting places. You take pleasure in participating in projects that promote community pride. You want to do your part to maintain a landmark in the heart of Lambertville. You like spending time with people who share your interests. You’re committed to making a difference in your community! http://lambertvilleh...calsociety.org/
  11. The Tewksbury Historical Society was established on February 19, 1989. The Society is organized exclusively to further research into and the preservation and dissemination of the history of the Township of Tewksbury, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. The Tewksbury Historical Society is a not-for-profit organization under the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Code 501 © (3). The Society was incorporated as a New Jersey not-for-profit corporation on January 9, 1992 and is a NJ registered charity. http://www.tewksburyhistory.net/ Like this View full record
  12. The Tewksbury Historical Society was established on February 19, 1989. The Society is organized exclusively to further research into and the preservation and dissemination of the history of the Township of Tewksbury, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. The Tewksbury Historical Society is a not-for-profit organization under the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Code 501 © (3). The Society was incorporated as a New Jersey not-for-profit corporation on January 9, 1992 and is a NJ registered charity. http://www.tewksburyhistory.net/ Like this
  13. Alexandria Township has an active historical society with programs on antique Christmas ornaments, the Civil War, old breweries, Indians and more, all related to our area. The Mt. Salem Church was the past headquarters for the Historical Society. http://www.alexandrianj.gov/index.asp?SEC=4E73A005-1F7B-43C4-9999-D1435A49F588&Type=B_BASIC The Prevost Farm House on the Milford-Frenchtown Road was donated to the Township and is being leased to the Historical Society for $1 a year. It opened as an historical library and museum to hold many of our interesting acquisitions related to the township and surrounding area. It is open to our school children and the community. The Society is always seeking contributions of furniture, pictures, books, maps, documents and clothing of the 1800’s period to add to the collection. We invite you to attend meetings and help us preserve the facts and fables of our community and hope you will consider becoming a member. Contact Info: Phone: 908-996-7071 View full record
  14. Alexandria Township has an active historical society with programs on antique Christmas ornaments, the Civil War, old breweries, Indians and more, all related to our area. The Mt. Salem Church was the past headquarters for the Historical Society. http://www.alexandrianj.gov/index.asp?SEC=4E73A005-1F7B-43C4-9999-D1435A49F588&Type=B_BASIC The Prevost Farm House on the Milford-Frenchtown Road was donated to the Township and is being leased to the Historical Society for $1 a year. It opened as an historical library and museum to hold many of our interesting acquisitions related to the township and surrounding area. It is open to our school children and the community. The Society is always seeking contributions of furniture, pictures, books, maps, documents and clothing of the 1800’s period to add to the collection. We invite you to attend meetings and help us preserve the facts and fables of our community and hope you will consider becoming a member. Contact Info: Phone: 908-996-7071
  15. Mission Statement: The mission of the Hunterdon County Historical Society is to collect, preserve and share the evolving social and material history of the entire County of Hunterdon, New Jersey. The Society will fulfill its mission through educational programs, research and publications, and by maintaining for public benefit the growing collections of the Society and the buildings that house them: The HCHS Archives, the Hiram E. Deats Memorial Library and the 1845 Doric House Museum. http://hunterdonhistory.org/ Like this
  16. Mission Statement: The mission of the Hunterdon County Historical Society is to collect, preserve and share the evolving social and material history of the entire County of Hunterdon, New Jersey. The Society will fulfill its mission through educational programs, research and publications, and by maintaining for public benefit the growing collections of the Society and the buildings that house them: The HCHS Archives, the Hiram E. Deats Memorial Library and the 1845 Doric House Museum. http://hunterdonhistory.org/ Like this View full record
  17. I find the site somewhat difficult to follow and use to find things.Of course their one link is a reently updated list of the records they have and location. http://www.co.hunterdon.nj.us/countyclerk.htm Hunterdon County Clerk’s Office Hall of Records 71 Main Street, PO Box 2900 Flemington, New Jersey 08822 908-788-1217 Monday - Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm
  18. I find the site somewhat difficult to follow and use to find things.Of course their one link is a reently updated list of the records they have and location. http://www.co.hunterdon.nj.us/countyclerk.htm Hunterdon County Clerk’s Office Hall of Records 71 Main Street, PO Box 2900 Flemington, New Jersey 08822 908-788-1217 Monday - Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm View full record
  19. Map: Hunterdon County 1851

    Nice map of Hunterdon County https://www.loc.gov/item/2012592358/
  20. Map: Hunterdon County 1851

    Nice map of Hunterdon County https://www.loc.gov/item/2012592358/ View full record
  21. Welcome to Hunterdon NJ

    We created this page to display county information for each state. Our team is engaged in building out the content to populate this page, sharing genealogy and history information. In the near future, we will be adding our library records which contain Books, Newspapers, Photos, Postcards, and other unique materials. Some of these are being presented to connect descendants with their family heirlooms (postcards, journals, Bibles). These library records will also be useful to those wanting assistance in finding an entry for their ancestors; we will perform "lookups" as time permits. If you have suggestions for content or basic input on the website, send us a message. We would be happy to incorporate your ideas. As we continue to populate this page, it should become more useful in your research so please check back soon!
  22. Welcome to Hunterdon NJ

    We created this page to display county information for each state. Our team is engaged in building out the content to populate this page, sharing genealogy and history information. In the near future, we will be adding our library records which contain Books, Newspapers, Photos, Postcards, and other unique materials. Some of these are being presented to connect descendants with their family heirlooms (postcards, journals, Bibles). These library records will also be useful to those wanting assistance in finding an entry for their ancestors; we will perform "lookups" as time permits. If you have suggestions for content or basic input on the website, send us a message. We would be happy to incorporate your ideas. As we continue to populate this page, it should become more useful in your research so please check back soon! View full record
  23. I am considering a trip to New Jersey in the hope it will help me find the records I am lacking to prove my Tinsman lineage. I am well aware of the family being the in Alexandria, Franklin, Alexander Tract, Barker Tract and being in the region in the mid 1700s. I browsed the Hunterdon County Historical Society webpages earlier today and found that their Library is open on Thursdays from 1200 until 1600. I also noticed they are also open on the second and fourth Saturdays from 10-4. I wonder if I can get there Thursday for a session, then head to Trenton or another location on Friday, then return for the remainder of my time on Saturday. I did browse their collections, but really have no idea where to start, but I bet there are going to be some smart and helpful people at the library.
×