Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ronald

What does Palatine mean?

Recommended Posts

    I think a definition is in order.  At least a construct that is stated.  I have been looking on line and in some books to determine what a "Palatine" means.  And? It isn't as simple as a definition.

                                              So, something from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Palatines

   Based on what I am reading there.  The coining of the phrase Palatine was specific to the Middle Rhine region and the emigrants that left Germany around 1709-1710 on their way to what ended up being the Colonies, England, and Ireland.  There are also indications that some in this migration came from a broader swath of land associated with the Palatinate. In summary, from a colonial perspective this "Poor Palatine" group came to the New York colony.

So what is the Middle Rhine?220px-Rhein-Karte.png.39593958c6ffac1bea 

       This map depicts the Middle Rhine as an area between Bingen in the south, and Bonn to the north.  What is clear to me?  My family hails from the Altstadt/Hachenburg area to the north and slightly east of Koblenz.  So I definitely have Palatine blood.  If this is the definition of the Palatines based upon their 1709/1710 emigration period it does at least establish the core region these people came from. But, there is the other statement that this area was not the sole factor in the 1709/1710 Palatine emigration, that others from a broader area called the Palatinate also were part of that event.

  So what is the Palatinate?

 

The County Palatine of the Rhine (German: Pfalzgrafschaft bei Rhein), later the Electorate of the Palatinate (German: Kurfürstentum Pfalz) or simply Electoral Palatinate (German: Kurpfalz), was a historical territory of the Holy Roman Empire, originally a palatinate administered by a count palatine. Its rulers served as prince-electors (Kurfürsten) from "time immemorial", were noted as such in a papal letter of 1261, and were confirmed as electors by the Golden Bull of 1356.

The fragmented territory stretched from the left bank of the Upper Rhine, from the Hunsrück mountain range in what is today the Palatinate region in the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate and the adjacent parts of the French region of Alsace (bailiwick of Seltz from 1418 to 1766) to the opposite territory on the east bank of the Rhine in present-day Hesse and Baden-Württemberg up to the Odenwald range and the southern Kraichgau region, containing the capital cities of Heidelberg and Mannheim.

The Counts Palatine of the Rhine held the office of Imperial vicars in the territories under Frankish law (in Franconia, Swabia and the Rhineland) and ranked among the most significant secular Princes of the Holy Roman Empire. Their climax and decline is marked by the rule of Elector Palatine Frederick V, whose coronation as King of Bohemia in 1619 sparked the Thirty Years' War. After the 1648 Peace of Westphalia, the ravaged lands were further afflicted by the "Reunion" campaigns launched by King Louis XIV of France, culminating in the Nine Years' War (1688–97). Ruled in personal union with the Electorate of Bavaria from 1777, the Electoral Palatinate was finally disestablished with the German mediatization in 1803.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, if I understand correctly, the Palatinate is a larger region which encompasses Palatine. The Palatinates being this group of 24 districts and 12 urban areas. If so, I think the Palatinates is the start of where we want to focus the research group.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems that would be a good assumption for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The term Palatine was used generally by English officials to indicate any immigrant from Germany in the 1700's. So often this term was used for Germans who were not from the Palatine region.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is pretty wide open it seems.  Many of the ships records even write it as Palatines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...