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  1. Certificates of deaths that occurred in Maryland counties beginning in 1898. Images of entries on 4X6 inch cards include name of decedent, place and cause of death, age, place of birth and names of parents, race, occupation, marital status and name of spouse, if any. Arranged chronologically by month and year, then alphabetically by surname for each county. Indexed for 1898-1910 by the BOARD OF HEALTH Death Record, Counties, Index series [MSA S1177]. ; microfilm, [MSA SM156]; online [MSA SE58]. Note that the Maryland law mandating the recordation of vital records by the counties, excluding Baltimore City, begins in May 1898 (Chapter 312, Article 43 of the Code of Public General Laws, title "Health", sub-title "State Board of Health"). Very few records consisting of death dates prior to May 1898 exist, having been recorded retroactively and in most cases are errors in recordation and not prior to 1898. http://guide.msa.maryland.gov/pages/series.aspx?ID=se42 View full record
  2. Certificates of deaths that occurred in Maryland counties beginning in 1898. Images of entries on 4X6 inch cards include name of decedent, place and cause of death, age, place of birth and names of parents, race, occupation, marital status and name of spouse, if any. Arranged chronologically by month and year, then alphabetically by surname for each county. Indexed for 1898-1910 by the BOARD OF HEALTH Death Record, Counties, Index series [MSA S1177]. ; microfilm, [MSA SM156]; online [MSA SE58]. Note that the Maryland law mandating the recordation of vital records by the counties, excluding Baltimore City, begins in May 1898 (Chapter 312, Article 43 of the Code of Public General Laws, title "Health", sub-title "State Board of Health"). Very few records consisting of death dates prior to May 1898 exist, having been recorded retroactively and in most cases are errors in recordation and not prior to 1898. http://guide.msa.maryland.gov/pages/series.aspx?ID=se42
  3. Wow, what a great digital resource. https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1803986 View full record
  4. Wow, what a great digital resource. https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1803986
  5. USMD

    Maryland

  6. USMD

    Town: Easton MD

    Originally called the "Talbot Court House" an act of legislation in 1788, renamed the town and county seat Easton. The early Federal period found the Court House, circa 1711-1712, serving the Maryland General Court and later became known as the "Capitol of the Eastern Shore". Quakerism began to impact the town in the late 1600s when the Third Haven Meeting House, circa 1682-1684, was constructed. The House stands today as the oldest religious building still in use in the United States and the earliest dated building in Maryland. Easton's experienced its first building activity following the War of 1812. Steamboats started plying the waters of Tred Avon River around 1816 and utilized Easton Point until their demise in 1932. The Christ Church was built in 1840-44. A stone edifice in the early English style, having a tower surmounted with a spire, the granite parish house was built in 1890. Disastrous fires, the railroad and historical preservation have all contributed to Easton's architectural evolution. The combination of Colonial, Federal and Victorian architecture creates remarkable streetscapes throughout the town. This style of architecture represents a way of life rapidly disappearing in many regions of the United States. The Talbot County Historic Preservation Commission, appointed by the Talbot County Council, continues to work with the community and residents to save our historic traditions and preserve our architectural treasures for future generations. The Historical Society of Talbot County provides a walking tour of Easton which reveals public buildings dating back to 1711 and houses of architectural significance dating to the late 18th century. The tour reveals historic places of worship, old taverns and a mill. The site on which the Tidewater Inn stands today has been home to an inn for over 200 years. Traditionally, Easton has served as the hub of business activity in the county since its earliest days. Today, it is known for its quality education system, medical facilities, businesses opportunities, county airport, award-winning restaurants and accommodations, boutiques, specialty shops and unique shopping centers. Exploration of the past can be enjoyed at the Historical Society of Talbot County at their Museum headquarters, the James Neall House, the Joseph Neall House or the Museum Shop. Well-trained and knowledgeable Docents provide tours through the historic district. The Maryland Room of the Talbot County Free Library can also provide a wealth of information on the history of the area. The Arts can be enjoyed at the Historic Avalon Theatre, recognized by Governor Parris Glendenning as the "Maryland's perfect example of smart growth". Built in 1921 as a movie/vaudeville house, the restored art deco theatre was renovated in the late 1980s with state-of-the-art sound, lighting, and comfort. The 400 seat theatre serves as year-round non-profit performing arts center with diverse programs, musical concerts, films, seminars, plays and community events. The Academy Art Museum is housed in a renovated 1820 schoolhouse and exhibits the best of local, regional and national artists. The Academy's permanent collection includes works by many of art history's most recognized figures of the 19th and 20th centuries. In additional to the permanent collection, the Museum hosts over 200 visual and performing arts programs annually. Like this
  7. USMD

    Town: Easton MD

    Originally called the "Talbot Court House" an act of legislation in 1788, renamed the town and county seat Easton. The early Federal period found the Court House, circa 1711-1712, serving the Maryland General Court and later became known as the "Capitol of the Eastern Shore". Quakerism began to impact the town in the late 1600s when the Third Haven Meeting House, circa 1682-1684, was constructed. The House stands today as the oldest religious building still in use in the United States and the earliest dated building in Maryland. Easton's experienced its first building activity following the War of 1812. Steamboats started plying the waters of Tred Avon River around 1816 and utilized Easton Point until their demise in 1932. The Christ Church was built in 1840-44. A stone edifice in the early English style, having a tower surmounted with a spire, the granite parish house was built in 1890. Disastrous fires, the railroad and historical preservation have all contributed to Easton's architectural evolution. The combination of Colonial, Federal and Victorian architecture creates remarkable streetscapes throughout the town. This style of architecture represents a way of life rapidly disappearing in many regions of the United States. The Talbot County Historic Preservation Commission, appointed by the Talbot County Council, continues to work with the community and residents to save our historic traditions and preserve our architectural treasures for future generations. The Historical Society of Talbot County provides a walking tour of Easton which reveals public buildings dating back to 1711 and houses of architectural significance dating to the late 18th century. The tour reveals historic places of worship, old taverns and a mill. The site on which the Tidewater Inn stands today has been home to an inn for over 200 years. Traditionally, Easton has served as the hub of business activity in the county since its earliest days. Today, it is known for its quality education system, medical facilities, businesses opportunities, county airport, award-winning restaurants and accommodations, boutiques, specialty shops and unique shopping centers. Exploration of the past can be enjoyed at the Historical Society of Talbot County at their Museum headquarters, the James Neall House, the Joseph Neall House or the Museum Shop. Well-trained and knowledgeable Docents provide tours through the historic district. The Maryland Room of the Talbot County Free Library can also provide a wealth of information on the history of the area. The Arts can be enjoyed at the Historic Avalon Theatre, recognized by Governor Parris Glendenning as the "Maryland's perfect example of smart growth". Built in 1921 as a movie/vaudeville house, the restored art deco theatre was renovated in the late 1980s with state-of-the-art sound, lighting, and comfort. The 400 seat theatre serves as year-round non-profit performing arts center with diverse programs, musical concerts, films, seminars, plays and community events. The Academy Art Museum is housed in a renovated 1820 schoolhouse and exhibits the best of local, regional and national artists. The Academy's permanent collection includes works by many of art history's most recognized figures of the 19th and 20th centuries. In additional to the permanent collection, the Museum hosts over 200 visual and performing arts programs annually. Like this View full record
  8. USMD

    Town: Oxford MD

    Chartered back to Augustine Herman's 1673 map of Maryland & Virginia, Oxford is one of Maryland's oldest towns. Mandated in 1694 by Maryland legislation as the first and only port-of-entry on the Easton Shore, the town gained significant prominence in colonial days and remained a booming port for over 75 years. Once named Williamstadt under the reign of Dutch King William III of England. Merchants from London, Liverpool and Bristol established stores in Oxford to trade merchandise for tobacco. Second only to Annapolis, Oxford was recognized as port to the largest number of ships. Ships delivering goods to the port could number as high as seven at any given time. When going on board, one would find that the favored cargo included tobacco, hides, salt port, wheat and lumber. The most prominent merchant was Robert Morris, the father of the financier of the American Revolution. Arriving in Oxford in 1738, Morris acquired a fortune as chief factor for the Foster Cunliffe & Sons, a large Liverpool trading house. A part of Morris' residence is incorporated in the Robert Morris Inn. Oxford's trade was unfavorably affected by the War of Independence and the popularity and growth of Baltimore as a chief transshipment point for the Chesapeake Region. The economy began to wane in the 1700's but came alive again in the mid-1800's. The construction of two churches, the Oxford Military Academy opened, the railroad terminus for the Maryland Delaware Railroad was built, two banks were erected and the first brick sidewalks were laid. Boat building skyrocketed in the late 1800's and two steamboat wharves serviced the rail and boat services. During the early 1900's, Oxford slowed down again. As Oxford and the nation were affected by World War II, the only successful business left was boat building. Many of the residents left to seeking employment in wartime industries. While the economy was hard hit at times, Oxford maintained its charm and community unity. Today, the town is compared to a picture-perfect postcard. Its beauty is recognized by visitors, magazines and books and protected and preserved by its residents. Elegant historic homes frame the banks of the Tred Avon River while sailboats and yachts gently pass by well manicured landscapes. With approximately 700 residents, the town's charming and unique characteristics portray miniature American at its very best.
  9. USMD

    Town: Oxford MD

    Chartered back to Augustine Herman's 1673 map of Maryland & Virginia, Oxford is one of Maryland's oldest towns. Mandated in 1694 by Maryland legislation as the first and only port-of-entry on the Easton Shore, the town gained significant prominence in colonial days and remained a booming port for over 75 years. Once named Williamstadt under the reign of Dutch King William III of England. Merchants from London, Liverpool and Bristol established stores in Oxford to trade merchandise for tobacco. Second only to Annapolis, Oxford was recognized as port to the largest number of ships. Ships delivering goods to the port could number as high as seven at any given time. When going on board, one would find that the favored cargo included tobacco, hides, salt port, wheat and lumber. The most prominent merchant was Robert Morris, the father of the financier of the American Revolution. Arriving in Oxford in 1738, Morris acquired a fortune as chief factor for the Foster Cunliffe & Sons, a large Liverpool trading house. A part of Morris' residence is incorporated in the Robert Morris Inn. Oxford's trade was unfavorably affected by the War of Independence and the popularity and growth of Baltimore as a chief transshipment point for the Chesapeake Region. The economy began to wane in the 1700's but came alive again in the mid-1800's. The construction of two churches, the Oxford Military Academy opened, the railroad terminus for the Maryland Delaware Railroad was built, two banks were erected and the first brick sidewalks were laid. Boat building skyrocketed in the late 1800's and two steamboat wharves serviced the rail and boat services. During the early 1900's, Oxford slowed down again. As Oxford and the nation were affected by World War II, the only successful business left was boat building. Many of the residents left to seeking employment in wartime industries. While the economy was hard hit at times, Oxford maintained its charm and community unity. Today, the town is compared to a picture-perfect postcard. Its beauty is recognized by visitors, magazines and books and protected and preserved by its residents. Elegant historic homes frame the banks of the Tred Avon River while sailboats and yachts gently pass by well manicured landscapes. With approximately 700 residents, the town's charming and unique characteristics portray miniature American at its very best. View full record
  10. Talbot County, Maryland Marriages Edward Starkey m. Susannah Harper, Aug. 18, 1742. Mary Webb m. Francis Chaplin, Dec. 14, 1742. Nathaniel Cannon m. Margaret Auld, Jan. 10, 1742-43. Jonathan Nicols m. Mary Knowles, April 25, 1743. Stanley Robins m. Sarah Goldsborough, Jan. 6, 1741-2. Jane Robinson m. Henry Martin, June 25, 1743. Benjamin Harding m. Hannah Martin, Nov. 18, 1739. Mary Hains m. Patrick Roach, Sept. 8, 1746. Nichols Cumings m, Mary Blackwell, Aug. 27, 1746. Margaret Price m. Robert Noble, Oct 30, 1741. SOURCE: Vol, 5, No 10, October 1915 Genealogy: a journal of American ancestry
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